Wednesday, March 02, 2011

William & Kate's wedding invitation wording: A little too with-it?

Click invite for engorged version
I meant to say sooner but one small detail of the Lord Chamberlain's invitation to the wedding of William and Kate interested me. The grammar. Guests are invited to the marriage of the prince with Kate. The traditional wording would normally employ the preposition to, although 'with' is not incorrect and is now customary in more fashionable circles: 'with' does enhance the suggestion of a meeting of equals.

However, it should be said that Debrett's, which I find quite common, is very much a to-ist  (click here) and appears to part company with the increasingly modish Royal Family, eschewing the with-ism in its formal wedding invitation template. Perhaps grammarians would care to comment.

11 comments:

Anonymous said...

at least they didn't use 'of' - something to be grateful for - as in 'bored of' instead of 'bored with'

Anonymous said...

I couldn't a flying cunt

Mrs Budworth said...

Is Madame trying to curry favour with or to The lady?

Anonymous said...

Are you taking me or Molly?
*sob into my tear-soaked pillow*

Madame Arcati said...

I have a TV show to watch that day. Alas.

Olivia J. Fox said...

perhaps it means 'with' as in 'co- starring' as we say out here in La-La Land?

Madame Arcati said...

Oscars and trebles all round!

Nelly Orb said...

Yes, I'll be watching it on the telly too - you closet monarchist

Madame Arcati said...

I shall be watching Cromwell.

Dr Fowler said...

In the verb phrase, one would say "married to". In the noun [marriage], to or with. It's optional.

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